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Six Foundational Design Principles

A set of six Foundational Design Principles drive the accelerated learning experiences for the new HSTW framework and its aligned Middle Grades, Technology Centers, Advanced Career (AC) STEM Pathway Academies and Senior Year Redesign frameworks. They undergird all our work on defining the type of accelerated learning experiences that students need to meet 2st century requirements.

Design Principles

reddot Design Principle 1: Prepare All Students for College and/or Career

reddot Design Principle 2: Redefine How Time Is Used to Connect Academic, Career Pathway and Workplace Learning

reddot Design Principle 3: Provide Time and Support for Students to Achieve College- and Career-Readiness Standards

reddot Design Principle 4: Redesign the Senior and 13th Years to Remove the Lines Between Secondary, Postsecondary and Workplace Learning

reddot Design Principle 5: Provide Students With School- and Community-Based Experiences to Help Set Future Career and Educational Goals

reddot Design Principle 6: Make School and Instruction Work for Students

 


Design Principle 1: Prepare All Students for College and/or Career

All students need assignments and instruction aligned to grade-level college- and career-readiness standards in academic and Career Pathway courses. The Literacy Design Collaborative (LDC), the Mathematics Design Collaborative (MDC) and project-based learning (PBL) are instructional processes that engage students in intellectually demanding assignments in academic and career and technical courses.

Design Principle 2: Redefine How Time Is Used to Connect Academic, Career Pathway and Workplace Learning

Students are motivated to engage in deeper learning when academic and career and technical teachers have time to plan connected learning opportunities. Project-based learning is key to making seamless connections between academic and Career Pathway courses of study, and literacy and math are key to creating strong project-based assignments.

Design Principle 3: Provide Time and Support for Students to Achieve College- and Career-Readiness Standards

Many students need accelerated learning experiences in the middle grades and high school to master college- and career- readiness standards. Some students need extended time and often multiple tiers of instruction and support to acquire the foundational literacy, math, technical, cognitive and behavioral skills needed to achieve career and postsecondary success.

Design Principle 4: Redesign the Senior and 13th Years to Remove the Lines Between Secondary, Postsecondary and Workplace Learning

Students who meet college- and career-readiness indicators for literacy and math by the end of grade 11 need a senior year that allows them to earn credit toward an associate or bachelor’s degree or advanced industry credential in high-demand, high-wage fields. A redesigned senior- and 13th-year program for prepared students would:

  • allow students to earn up to 30 semester hours of college credit or credits toward an advanced credential and the required work-based learning experiences.
  • require students who plan postsecondary studies but fail to meet literacy- and math-readiness indicators to enroll in special readiness courses in the senior year. 
  • involve businesses, industries, postsecondary institutions and school district leaders to combine resources to plan a relevant and quality experience for the senior and 13th years.

Design Principle 5: Provide Students With School- and Community-Based Experiences to Help Set Future Career and Educational Goals

Middle grades and early high school students, with parental involvement, participate in progressive school- and community-based experiences that explore the career and educational options reflecting their interests and aptitudes. Students need to learn firsthand about broad career fields and future possibilities that align with their interests, aptitudes and abilities. No later than eighth grade, students participate in counseling for careers to develop a program of study that aligns with their emerging career and educational aspirations.

Design Principle 6: Make School and Instruction Work for Students

Schools must find time for more in-depth professional development for teachers and interdisciplinary groups to plan grade-level assignments that engage and motivate students. This involves finding ways to:

  • organize schools around students’ interests with varying ability levels and create assignments that engage and motivate students to succeed in meeting college- and career-readiness standards;
  • make greater use of technology and other strategies to engage students in personalized assignments;
  • provide support to teachers to help them become facilitators of student learning; and
  • enable high schools to design a senior year to ensure that the other students have literacy, math, technical and other skills needed to transition into employment or advanced training. 
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