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Oklahoma CareerTech Teaches High School Students How to Handle Their Money

“Students today need to become safe and savvy consumers, and to take charge of their financial futures.”
Oklahoma CareerTech Teaches High School Students How to Handle Their Money

Family and Consumer Sciences students at Garber High School use iPads to complete an assignment.

It’s a fact: Oklahoma teenagers don’t understand money.

Although it may be a few years before teens need to apply concepts such as 401Ks and long-term care insurance, basic financial concepts such as balancing a checkbook and building a credit score are just around the corner.

Oklahoma high students who graduated in 2014 were the first to be held accountable for understanding the 14 basic financial concepts outlined in Oklahoma’s Passport to Financial Literacy Act of 2007. The passage of the bill presented logistical questions for schools, such as who would teach the courses and where they would find material.

Many Oklahoma high schools have rolled financial literacy into their CareerTech classrooms, primarily in family and consumer sciences and agricultural education. CareerTech has also made available curriculum materials that align with the state passport. The Oklahoma Council on Economic Education endorses the CareerTech Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center’s “Personal Financial Literacy.” CIMC developed the material with guidance from the Jump$tart Coalition for Financial Literacy.

“We want students to be better prepared for today’s financial challenges,” said Craig Maile, manager of CareerTech’s Curriculum Center.

In financial news this week, Home Depot announced it may have been the victim of credit card hackers, following companies such as P.F. Chang's and Target, who recently announced major security breaches. Maile says protection against identity theft is just one of the topics high schoolers need to learn before they graduate. 

“Our 'Personal Financial Literacy' curriculum also addresses taxes, banking, managing financial risk and even preparing for retirement,” he said. “Students today need to become safe and savvy consumers, and to take charge of their financial futures.”

Oklahoma is one of 17 states in the country that require financial literacy in high school.

For more information, please visit http://www.okcareertech.org/educators/cimc/.

 

Connie Romans, Communications and Marketing Coordinator

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