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Director's Weekly Memo 2017-5-30

CTSO officers attend state training; Autry Technology Center names Oxbow Calcining LLC as Partner for Progress; DECA members earn industry certifications; Northeast Tech students mix learning and play in mock hospital setting; Moore Norman student creates RFID reader; Summer Conference registration is open; CareerTech events; and useful links.

CTSO officers attend state training

From left, Kirsten Taffar, SkillsUSA; Aksah Cherian, HOSA; Jerrid Hobbie, FCCLA; Marcie Mack, CareerTech state director; William Huang, DECA; Alyvea Sloan, TSA; Summer Moffitt, BPA; and Ridge Hughbanks, FFA.Oklahoma CareerTech student organization state officers this week attended CareerTech University at Camp Tulakogee, where they learned and networked and planned for the upcoming school year.

State Director Marcie Mack spoke to the officers Wednesday about the history of the CareerTech System.

During CTU, the officers participated in training sessions and group activities to help them lead their organizations.

Pictured are, from left, From left, Kirsten Taffar, SkillsUSA; Aksah Cherian, HOSA; Jerrid Hobbie, FCCLA; Marcie Mack, CareerTech state director; William Huang, DECA; Alyvea Sloan, TSA; Summer Moffitt, BPA; and Ridge Hughbanks, FFA.

 

Autry Technology Center names Oxbow Calcining LLC as Partner for Progress

Autry Technology Center named Oxbow Calcining LLC as its 2017 Partner for Progress.

Oxbow Calcining produces and markets calcined petroleum coke. The company has calcining plants in North and South America and is an equity investor and exclusive marketer of calcined coke produced by Petroleum Coke Industries Inc. in Kuwait. Petroleum is a carbon-rich solid material derived from oil refining. Calcining removes hydrocarbons from the coke, which is used in aluminum, steel and titanium smelting.

Autry provides Oxbow with training courses that involve unique and specialized equipment, including kiln maintenance, bagging and palletizing, dust collection and automation. Autry also organizes required monthly Occupational Safety and Health Administration training and other site-specific safety training and provides required certification training on-site to reach environmental goals.

All of Oxbow’s supervisors also participated in an eight-week training program developed by Autry and Oxbow to provide training on communication, conflict resolution, coaching, accountability and leadership.

 

DECA members earn industry certifications

Oklahoma CareerTech State Director Marcie Mack recognized 30 DECA members at the Oklahoma Career Development Conference for earning industry certifications offered through a partnership between Oklahoma DECA and the American Hotel and Lodging Association.

DECA members who attain the highest scores on the hospitality and tourism cluster exam earn the certified guest service professional, recognizing them for knowing how to provide excellent guest service and for being committed to creating memorable guest experiences.

Oklahoma DECA has increased membership by 10 percent this year and had 208 delegates who attended the International Career Development Conference in Anaheim, California.

 

Northeast Tech students mix learning and play in mock hospital setting

Northeast Tech Mock Hospital
Kasey Harless acted as a surgeon during the mock hospital event at NTC Kansas. Second-graders from Kansas Elementary participated as patients, and here Aiden Graham is being prepped for surgery.
Kasey Harless acted as a surgeon during the mock hospital event at NTC Kansas. Second graders from Kansas Elementary participated as patients, and here Aiden Graham is being prepped for surgery.

The classrooms at Northeast Technology Center’s Kansas Campus were transformed into a mock hospital for a few hours on a Friday afternoon as second-grade patients donned hospital gowns and prepared for surgery.

“This is a fun event that gives our nursing students a chance to interact with young patients and do some teaching,” said practical nursing instructor Jodi Bell. “The goal of the event is to alleviate the little ones’ apprehension about going to a hospital and also spark their interest in a medical career.”

NTC nursing students visited the second-grade classrooms at Kansas Elementary to talk to students about what happens when someone goes to the hospital and what they could expect during their visit to the mock hospital.

“It really offers a nice break from what they do every day,” said Kansas second-grade teacher Chaney Bendabout. “We had some that were a little scared, but they warmed up once they got here. Since they are the first class from their school to do it this year, they feel special.”

When they checked in, the elementary students received medical folders and ID bracelets and were paired up with NTC practical nursing students who acted as guides and gave reassurance throughout the process.

“We let them experience a little bit of everything: X-rays, EKG, surgery, recovery. And, of course, before they leave, they have to pay their bill,” Bell said. “It’s all pretend, of course, but it’s great practice for our students.”

Aside from riding in the wheelchairs, one of the favorite stations was the operating room. The surgeons on duty helped the patients on to the operating table where broken arms and legs were fixed, and one creative patient even underwent sinus surgery.

Second-grader Aiden Graham was one of the first to rotate through the stations, and he was a little bummed with his make-believe injury.

“I should’ve got stitches,” Graham said. “I got a fractured arm instead.”

Graham, who confessed to already having several sets of stitches in his short lifetime, liked the mock hospital much better than his real-life visits.

“I’ve been to the ER, and they put a needle in my head,” Graham said. “Today was more fun because it didn’t really happen. It was just pretend.”

After surgery, patients went through post op and recovery before heading to the business office to pay their bill with the play money that was provided. From start to finish, each student’s hospital experience lasted 15-20 minutes.

Bell said she hopes to expand the program to other elementary schools next year.

“It’s a lot of work, but it’s really a great experience for all the students, no matter what their age,” she said. “It’s fun for both groups because it takes them outside the normal classroom and lets them learn in a different way, outside of just reading a book.”

Submitted by Northeast Technology Center

 

Moore Norman student creates RFID reader


By Mari Farthing
Freelance writer/editor

Spencer Hendon
Spencer Hendon
Some students are dreamers, some are doers -- and some, like Spencer Hendon, are both.

During a discussion about new ideas in Rachel Hurt’s computer programming class at Moore Norman Technology Center just before the winter break, students considered using a radio frequency identification reader to track student attendance. Hendon was in the room for the discussion, so during the break, he got to work.

“I had the parts and home and I taught myself Python,” said Hendon, referring to the Raspberry Pi computer kit and Python programming language used in his RFID reader.

Hendon, a junior at Westmoore High School, started attending classes at MNTC in fall 2016 and has been programming for several years on his own and at school. His innovative, portable RFID reader is about the size of a deck of cards.

MNTC tries to prepare students for a business environment as much as possible while also training them in the industry-specific skills needed.

“Our classes are made to be like industry as much as possible,” said Hurt. “An RFID reader is like clocking in at work.”

Hendon made his device out of spare parts he had on hand, sourcing material pricing online with Hurt afterwards.

“Software development is expensive,” said Hurt, and RFID card reader systems on the market can cost thousands of dollars to purchase. The device created by Hendon would cut that several thousand dollar price tag to under $100 per unit.

There’s no plan in place to begin using the RFID reader in the classroom, but it would be a great way to use the in-house knowledge to meet a need and allow students in different classes to work together, Hurt said.

 “We’re always looking for projects that combine different classes,” she said, adding that she envisions future collaboration with other classes to bring the project to fruition, helping to develop interfaces, applications and more. “Just like in industry, nobody is working in a bubble with just others in their own field.”

MNTC's programming and software development program is open to high school juniors and seniors and adult students. To learn more visit here.

Submitted by Rachel Hurt, Moore Norman Technology Center

 

Summer Conference registration is open

Registration for the 50th annual Oklahoma CareerTech Summer conference is open at http://www.okcareertech.org/summer-conference/registration.

The conference will be Aug. 1-2 at the Oklahoma City Cox Convention Center. For more information, visit http://www.okcareertech.org/summer-conference.

 

CareerTech events

Teacher Institute 2016-2017 Cohort, June 5

FCCLA District Officer Training, June 7

Teacher Institute 2016-2017 Cohort, June 12

IoT Connecting Things, June 13

Oklahoma FCCLA Alumni Rookie Camp, June 14

 

Useful links

Oklahoma Horizon Schedule

Follow us on Twitter at @okcareertech and find us on Facebook at OKCareerTech and on Instagram at oklahomacareertech.

For news about Oklahoma’s CareerTech System, subscribe to CareerTech communications.

State Agency Assistance at a Glance

National Center for Research in Career and Technical Education

Adult Basic Education Foundations newsletters

Oklahoma Works

OK Career Guide

CareerTech Curriculum

You can’t change what happened last week, but you can learn from it, and choose happiness this week. -- Anton K. Kressnig
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